University of California, Riverside

Faculty Profile System



Graduate School of Education Emeriti


Faculty Listing

Name Research Areas Contact
Mitchell, DouglasE. Douglas E. Mitchell
Professor of the Graduate Division
    The focus of my research and published writings has been on state legislative decision-making, labor relations, teacher incentive systems, public support for public schools, desegregation, class size and school board elections. Current Curriculum Vitae

Graduate School of Education
douglas.mitchell@ucr.edu
Office: 2125 Sproul Hall
Phone: (951) 827-4547
Dillon, JamesT. James Dillon
Professor, Emeritus
    Conceptions of teaching, questioning and discussion processes, philosophy of education

Graduate School of Education

Office: Sproul Hall
Phone: 
Bossert, Steven Steven Bossert
Professor Emeritus
    Sociology of Education; organizational leadership and change; school and classroom organization effects.

Graduate School of Education
steven.bossert@ucr.edu
Office: 1207 Sproul Hall
Phone: 951-827-4633
Newman, RichardS. Richard S. Newman
Professor Emeritus
    I’m interested in help seeking--both academic and social help seeking. The question regarding academic help seeking is, why is it so difficult for students to raise their hand and ask a question when they don’t understand an assignment? I became interested in this issue when I was a classroom teacher and realized this is a real- world problem that often can be solved. Help seeking can be facilitated; kids can be encouraged and supported to ask for help. The question regarding social help seeking (which is what I’ve been interested in most recently) has to do with the difficulty that kids have when they are being harassed, bullied, threatened or teased. Again, why is it so difficult to get help?

Graduate School of Education
richard.newman@ucr.edu
Office: 1207 Sproul Hall
Phone: 951-827-4663
Page, RebaN. Reba N. Page
Professor Emeritus
    Tracking in high schools, how schools are social institutions and in part construct the society we live in by affecting children in various ways. I’m also now interested in science education. Most recently, I’ve gotten funding from NIH to study what the science curriculum is for undergraduates in colleges and universities, particularly what it is for underrepresented minorities. Curriculum and cultural differentiation, particularly as they are manifested in tracking in US secondary schools. High school science What is it? Who decides? How does it matter? The complexities of qualitative research. Findings: The impact on classroom practice of recent state and national policies in science education has been paradoxical, at best. This should not surprise us, however, because US culture is deeply paradoxical, most centrally in the value it places on both individualism and competition and the common good. Accordingly, reforms in science education make ambiguous and often contradictory demands for greater excellence and equity in school science. However, they provide woefully inadequate material and intellectual support for meeting these ambitious demands. Without support, teachers haphazardly mix elements of the initiatives with more established practices. The result is a hodgepodge curriculum that presents different versions of school science, any one of which may contradict and cancel out the others. Students see the contradictions. They respond by rejecting school science and remaining content with the science they already know. With teachers, they produce an ABSENCE of science in high school science classes.

Graduate School of Education
reba.page@ucr.edu
Office: 1207 Sproul Hall
Phone: 827-4633
Sperling, Melanie Melanie Sperling
Professor Emeritus
    Improving writing and other literacy skills (such as reading) in secondary schools; teaching, learning and assessing writing and literacy; exploring how teachers and students look at a piece of writing, how they make sense of it and how students use classroom experiences to develop skills in writing.  I’ve been most interested in researching classes where excellent teachers care about teaching their students to write well. My research has focused on high school largely because, when I began my career, it was a neglected area of literacy research. High school is the important academic light toward which elementary and middle school students reach as they mature as thinkers and learners, and it’s the gatekeeper to higher education. High school sits at the center of the whole education system.A driving force in my professional life has been the recognition that literacy is at the center of educational activity.

Graduate School of Education
melanie.sperling@ucr.edu
Office: Sproul Hall
Phone: (951) 827-5784
Hanson, MarkE Mark Hanson
Professor Emeritus
    Governance and decision making in educational institutions Comparative international education, emphasis on Latin America Knowledge transfer and multi-national corporations in Mexico

Graduate School of Education
mark.hanson@ucr.edu
Office: 1207 Sproul Hall
Phone: 951-288-0835
Franklin, V.P. V.P. Franklin
Distinguished Professor
    History of Education; Strategies for dealing with students who have dropped out of school or are on the verge of dropping out; vocational training programs that offer smaller classes and a more personalized curriculum.I’m researching the origins of the Operations Industrialization Centers founded in Philadelphia in 1963. OIC centers are vocational educational centers that were founded by Rev. Leon Sullivan, who came out of the civil rights protests that took place in Philadelphia in the late 1950s and early 1960s.By 1965, it became part of the war on poverty. The Office of Economic Opportunity decided this was an activity that would be part of manpower, job training programs. So the O.E.O began to assist other cities that would be interested in opening an OIC. OIC centers opened up all over the United States. By 1970, you had 62 OIC centers around the country, including here in California. They introduced the basic literacy training program that served as a feeder program into the vocational programs and these OIC centers still exist. I’m interested in documenting this alternative vocational educational program that has spread throughout the United States and throughout Africa.

Graduate School of Education/Department of History
vp.franklin@ucr.edu
Office: 7707 HMNSS
Phone: (951) 827-1976
Duffy, Sharon Sharon Duffy
Dean for UCR Extension, Professor
    My primary research focus is on the conceptualization and diagnosis of intellectual disability and, within that, I study the construct of adaptive behavior and its measurement. Limitations in adaptive skills are required for a diagnosis of intellectual disability. My initial research was on the development of adaptive behavior and residential placement of persons with developmental disabilities and from there I began to look at educational placement of special education students. My dissertation was on measuring quality of life, which is a way of looking at whether decisions about placements are good ones. Does it improve a person’s quality of life to be placed in one setting over another? Because quality of life is rather abstract and subjective, measurement is a challenge. Current Curriculum Vitae

Graduate School of Education
sharon.duffy@ucr.edu
Office: 0337 UNEX, Extension Center
Phone: (951) 827-4102
 
 

More Information 

General Campus Information

University of California, Riverside
900 University Ave.
Riverside, CA 92521
Tel: (951) 827-1012

Department Information

Graduate School of Education
1207 Sproul Hall

Tel: (951) 827-5234
Fax: (951) 827-3942
E-mail: robert.wolfer@ucr.edu
 
 

Footer

Last Modified: 10/26/17